Category: The Knowledge Project

Marc Garneau on the Future of Transportation

Former military officer, astronaut, engineer (and current Minister of Transport) Marc Garneau (@MarcGarneau) and I discuss the future of transportation, space, information flow in politics and what it means to be a liberal.

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Marc Garneau is a Canadian politician, an engineer, and former astronaut who holds the distinction of being the first Canadian in space. He is currently serving as the Canadian Minister of Transport.

This episode of The Knowledge Project was recorded in front of a live audience in Montreal, Canada at a Junto event. (You’ll hear bits of French from the audience questions here and there at the end, but the interview and Marc’s responses are predominantly in English.).

In this fascinating interview, we discuss:

  • What the future of transportation looks like (including self-driving cars and their second-order effects)
  • The effect that new technologies have on how governments invest in infrastructure
  • How truck and taxi drivers throughout the world will be impacted in the future
  • Marc’s experiences in space as the first Canadian to join three NASA expeditions
  • What it means to be a liberal in 2017, and how the political landscape is shifting
  • How we, as citizens, can judge the performance of an elected politician
  • How Marc ensures that he’s getting accurate information in a sometimes backward and messy political system

And so much more.

There’s so much to learn and think about in this discussion. Please enjoy!

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The long chains of reasonings …

The long chains of reasonings, simple and easy, by which geometricians are wont to achieve their most complex proofs, had led me to suppose that all things, the knowledge of which man may achieve, are strung together in the same way, and that there is nothing so distant as ultimately to be beyond our mental grasp, or so hidden that we cannot uncover it, provided only we avoid accepting falsehoods as true, and always preserve in our thoughts the discipline essential for the deduction of one truth from another.

René Descartes, Le Discours de la méthode pt 2 (1637)(S.H. transl.)