Tag: Wisdom

The Oracle, a Manual of the Art of Discretion

In The Art of Worldly Wisdom, Christopher Maurer translates this gem from Baltasar Gracián y Morales:

Know how to sell your wares, intrinsic quality isn’t enough. Not everyone bites at substance or looks for inner value. People like to follow the crowd; they go someplace because they see other people do so. It takes much skill to explain something’s value. You can use praise, for praise arouses desire. At other times you can give things a good name (but be sure to flee from affectation). Another trick is to offer something only to those in the know, for everyone believes himself an expert, and the person who isn’t will want to be one. Never praise things for being easy or common: you’ll make them seem vulgar and facile. Everybody goes for something unique. Uniqueness appeals both to the taste and to the intellect.

Still curious? While written in 1647, the book is packed full of wisdom.

Warren Buffett on Temperament

“Investing is not a game where the guy with the 160 IQ beats the guy with the 130 IQ. Once you have ordinary intelligence, what you need is the temperament to control the urges that get other people into trouble in investing.”

Warren Buffett

We’re in the (bad) Habit of Associating Value with Scarcity

James Gleick, author of The Information: A History, A Theory, A Flood, says:

We’re in the habit of associating value with scarcity, but the digital world unlinks them. You can be the sole owner of a Jackson Pollock or a Blue Mauritius but not of a piece of information — not for long, anyway. Nor is obscurity a virtue. A hidden parchment page enters the light when it molts into a digital simulacrum. It was never the parchment that mattered.

The Art and Science of Asking Better Questions

At the recommendation of Warren Buffett’s Biographer, Alice Schroeder, I’ve been reading The Craft of Interviewing.

Schroeder seems pretty crafty at knowing when, what, and how to ask questions that get to interesting answers.

Given our podcast, The Knowledge Project, I endevor to ask better qeustions. I want to suppress my ego and stop thinking about what I want to say when the other person is talking and let them talk.

I’ve never been taught how to ask questions, which makes me wonder if I’m getting the most out of the questions I do ask.

If you think about it, asking better questions is really just a clever way to steal from the rich and give to the poor. In this case I’m stealing knowledge from someone that has it (them) and giving it to somoene that needs it (me).

I have a lot of smart friends — by smart, I mean incredibly smart, not just plain smart — and I want to maximize the knowledge I gain from this privilege when we’re together

Here are some of the things I dog-eared while reading this book that you might be interested in:

  • The interview, generally, may take two shapes: one, like a funnel, and the other like an inverted funnel. The funnel-shaped interview opens with generalities – “What are the benefits of nuclear warfare, Mr. President?” – then pins down the generalizations – “When and were has it produced those spectacular sunsets that you mention?” The funnel allows the subject some say in the direction of the interview.
  • Sherlock Holmes would have been fond of the inverted-funnel; it opens with hard, fast, specific questions, then ascends to a more general ground. Used appropriately this form can help put people at ease. Another way to put people at ease is to start with the easy questions. (Learn to think more like Holmes.)
  • Don’t ever make someone feel as if he can’t get his point across, no matter how hard he tries.
  • Far too many people ask questions that try to put the spotlight on themselves rather than the person with the information.
  • Avoid two-part, hypothetical, and leading questions.
  • People won’t confess their inner thoughts unless they have proof the person asking those questions is sympathetic.
  • Mike Wallace says “The single most interesting thing you can do in television, I find, is to ask a good question and then let the answer hang there for two or three seconds or four seconds as though you’re expecting more.”
  • Envelope tough questions with “people are saying” because that helps avoid the person responding from thinking the questioner is attacking them. (Blame someone else for the question.) Another technique for this is to imply the question is a playful one, “I’d like to play the devil’s advocate for a moment.” You can also preface the question with praise.

If anyone knows of other books on asking better questions shoot me an email.

Update: We did a whole interview on asking better questions.

The long chains of reasonings …

The long chains of reasonings, simple and easy, by which geometricians are wont to achieve their most complex proofs, had led me to suppose that all things, the knowledge of which man may achieve, are strung together in the same way, and that there is nothing so distant as ultimately to be beyond our mental grasp, or so hidden that we cannot uncover it, provided only we avoid accepting falsehoods as true, and always preserve in our thoughts the discipline essential for the deduction of one truth from another.

René Descartes, Le Discours de la méthode pt 2 (1637)(S.H. transl.)