Tag: Reading Lists

The Farnam Street Members Summer 2016 Reading List

We recently asked our Members to recommend a single summer read, and why, and thought we might share some of their recommendations with you. Here are their choices and their reasoning:

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Different: Escaping the Competitive Herd

“I would add Different to the list – unique insight into marketing and strategy tactics that have worked in highly competitive industries.”

The Course of Love: A Novel

“I’m currently madly in love with Alain De Botton’s newest book, The Course of Love. It’s a novel with interludes of philosophy that have really helped me to understand relationships (of all kinds) and nurse a little more empathy for others.”

When Breath Becomes Air

Some of my favorite books act like a mirror and force me to examine my own life. When Breath Becomes Air is one of those. While there are sections in the book that are not well written, and some that seem out of place, you forgive that as a reader because you know the author passed away while writing the book. While, and after, reading the book, I kept on asking myself the most important questions: what do I want out of life? What is worth doing with my time? What is the right balance between achieving and spending time with loved ones?”

Manias, Panics, and Crashes

There is a reason why it has been in print since 1978.”

All I Want to Know is Where I’m Going to Die So I’ll Never Go There

Peter Bevelin’s new book is an interesting set of dialogues between A Seeker, the Librarian, Munger and Buffett.  I’m not finished yet but it’s an interesting construction of Buffett and Munger’s wisdom. There are a few spots that are heavy on the adulation and a couple places that could have been better edited but on the whole I’m a fan.”

Paper Promises: Debt, Money, and the New World Order / The Last Vote: The Threats to Western Democracy

“I find two books from Philip Coggan who writes the Buttonwood column at The Economist very interesting and very topical in these days.”

Peak: Secrets from the New Science of Expertise

“My choice would be Peak. Because it is by far the best book covering deliberate practice. Could be life changing to anyone new to the field.”

Doing Good Better: How Effective Altruism Can Help You Make a Difference

“It’s not the ‘best’ book out there (though it’s very far from the worst). It’s not the most enjoyable read. It’s not the top of the ‘page for page most full of wisdom’ list. But it *is* the one that, were everyone to read it, would have the best chance of making the world a better place (and quite possibly the collective lives of the individuals that read it too).”

Homo Faber

“A German classic not so well known in the english-speaking world about an engineer who is exposed to a number of freak events “fooled by randomness”-style which completely changes his intuition about probability.”

Peripheral Visions: Learning along the Way

“A really fantastic book based on Mary Catherine Bateson’s work in foreign cultures. Tough to describe in a nutshell, but the title comes from her encouragement to seek more answers from the periphery, versus what we often find in front of us. She talks a lot about lifelong learning and many of the values we’d talk about here. But it’s from a slightly different perspective, and we frankly don’t get enough women authors recommended.

Seven Brief Lessons on Physics

“I would recommend Seven Brief Lessons on Physics. A bit on the side of science/physics but a nice small read that simplifies the broad concepts in physics.”

The Inevitable: Understanding the 12 Technological Forces That Will Shape Our Future

“Really enjoyed The Inevitable by Kevin Kelly, a more balanced, even optimistic vision of the future than many are currently presenting. For example, Kevin isn’t worried about AI destroying all Human Life, he believes that in the same way that in the past we electrified existing Mechanical items, we will take those items again, and this time add AI to them.

Looking back from 2050 to today, we will marvel that the internet was ‘just getting started’, and that the internet we use today wasn’t really ‘The Internet’, for example in the future we will have Time Sliders, so taking a webcam in Time Square, you could rewind from 2050 to see the New Years’ celebration in 2035.

Balancing this is the admission that negatives such as Mass Surveillance aren’t going away, and that because of the network effect, cloud AI will be limited to a few large companies.

A great book for speculating about the future.”

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Want More? Try 5 books that just might change your life, or the list of books that have changed ours.

What The Rich Read At the Beach

JP Morgan Reading List 2014

With summer quickly approaching it’s about time to hit the beach.

What should you read?

J.P. Morgan Chase might be the most well-read bank in the world and they have some suggestions for you.

Not only does the bank give its interns a daunting reading list but it also gives its rich clients a list of suggestions as well. Darin Oduyoye, who heads up communications for J.P. Morgan’s Asset Management division, says the list was started as a way to keep in touch with clients throughout the summer.

Getting on the famous list is about as easy as becoming a millionaire: 568 titles were submitted from J.P. Morgan Asset Management offices around the world this year and reviewed by a 16-person committee that must have done nothing but read for a year. That’s 35 books per person, fewer than the 161 I read in the past year, but still way above average. When the list first came out the competition was easier with only 115 recommendations vying for the coveted 10 spots.

Even the CEO, Jamie Dimon, chimes in with suggestions.

Here’s this year’s list of summer reading for the bank’s wealthy clients:

Art & Place: Site-Specific Art of the Americas

From the world’s premier publisher of books on the visual arts comes a stunning volume that will delight art lovers and art collectors. Art & Place takes readers to 60 cities across the Americas to some of the most provocative and fascinating site-specific artworks in the Western Hemisphere—illustrating the inexplicable link between the chosen artworks and the places they reside.

Thrive: The Third Metric to Redefining Success and Creating a Life of Well-Being, Wisdom, and Wonder, by Arianna Huffington

Executives around the globe know that money and power can often only make someone so happy. It’s finding the “third metric” that truly provides the keys to passion, joy and fulfillment in one’s life. In Thrive, Arianna Huffington—one of the most influential women in the world—takes the reader on his or her own journey of self-realization. Combining a deep personal narrative with scientific data, Huffington formulates a new model for total well-being.

Talk Like TED: The 9 Public-Speaking Secrets of the World’s Top Minds, by Carmine Gallo

Go inside the minds of TED’s online presenters. A nonprofit devoted to spreading ideas, TED—Technology, Entertainment and Design—features short, powerful talks on myriad subjects. Public-speaking coach Carmine Gallo pinpoints the top tips of the celebrated community’s most popular presenters. With advice to hone the skills of even well-seasoned executives, Talk Like TED is a fascinating and infinitely helpful look at one of the world’s most common fears.

The Metropolitan Revolution: How Cities and Metros Are Fixing Our Broken Politics and Fragile Economy, by Bruce Katz and Jennifer Bradley.

Philanthropists, endowments and foundations are often presented with lists of challenges in American cities—political barriers to growth, lack of economic diversity, immigration. But Bruce Katz and Jennifer Bradley carry the banner for cities that are getting it right. The Metropolitan Revolution highlights success stories from some of America’s most-populous areas and shows that big improvements can happen quickly when people are willing to make small changes.

The Second Machine Age: Work, Progress, and Prosperity in a Time of Brilliant Technologies, by Erik Brynjolfsson and Andrew McAfee

As societies progress, those who can best adapt to change have the highest chance of success. MIT’s Brynjolfsson and McAfee detail the vast technological changes that are already underway, and provide a look at the potential changes to come. They also unveil a plan of action to understand, cope with and embrace the transformative nature of society today. For the forward-thinking business executive, this is a book that shouldn’t be missed.

Things a Little Bird Told Me: Confessions of the Creative Mind, by Biz Stone

Who better than Biz Stone to offer advice and inspiration to up-and-coming entrepreneurs and next-generation leaders ready to take the reins of the family business? The co-founder and co-inventor of Twitter provides invaluable insights. Combining examples from his own life, principles he’s learned along the way, and true stories from his experiences at Google and Twitter, Stone presents a well-paced, informative personal narrative on the creative process.

The Future of the Mind: The Scientific Quest to Understand, Enhance, and Empower the Mind, by Michio Kaku

The secrets of the human brain are revealed in this powerful work by renowned physicist and futurist Dr. Michio Kaku. The Future of the Mind guides the reader on a journey of scientific discovery, illustrating that many facets of the world’s most intriguing science fiction stories—such as telepathy, telekinesis and mind control—may, in fact, already exist. Kaku provides a glimpse into the potential of future and new possibilities as the human mind becomes linked with modern technology.

Olives, Lemons & Za’atar: The Best Middle Eastern Home Cooking, by Rawia Bishara

Bishara will always be quick to point out that her first name means “storyteller” in Arabic. She deftly lives up to it, taking the reader through tales of her own life and culture, with her beloved cuisine serving as a guide. Bishara has instilled in her book the same warmth and comfort that can be found in her neighborhood eatery, Brooklyn’s Tanoreen.

An Astronaut’s Guide to Life on Earth: What Going to Space Taught Me About Ingenuity, Determination, and Being Prepared for Anything, by Col. Chris Hadfield

What’s worse than being locked out of the house? Having it happen 200 miles above the surface of the Earth while traveling more than 17,000 miles per hour. Journey with Colonel Chris Hadfield as he breaks into a locked space station, and learn how his NASA training prepared him for the seemingly impossible. Hadfield shares his insights into thinking on your feet and maintaining calm during even the direst crises.

The Billionaire and the Mechanic: How Larry Ellison and a Car Mechanic Teamed Up to Win Sailing’s Greatest Race, the America’s Cup, by Julian Guthrie

The 34th America’s Cup will be remembered as one of the most exciting and improbable comebacks in the history of offshore yacht racing. But for Larry Ellison, his Oracle Team USA’s first win—in 2010—will always be epic. This story of an equally improbable partnership between an auto mechanic and one of the world’s wealthiest individuals will captivate sports enthusiasts, amateur yachters and fans of Ellison’s helmsman Ben Ainslie.

5 Books That Will Change Your Life

Reading is important to me. Not only is it one way to fill in the gaps left by my formal education but it is a meaningful way to better myself. Reading alone, however, isn’t enough. What you read and how you apply it matters. In the past year, I started reading over 300 books and finished 161 of them.

Reading what everyone else reads is good for conversation, perhaps, but it’s not going to help you to think differently. And if you can’t think differently, you’re always going to be a one-legged man in an ass kicking contest.

With that in mind, here are five books that will change your life and enable you to see things in a new light.

1. Collected Maxims and Other Reflections by La Rochefoucauld
La Rochefoucauld’s critical and pithy analysis of human behavior won’t soon be forgotten. A list of people influenced by his maxims include Nietzsche, Voltaire, Proust, de Gaulle, and Conan Doyle. “The reader’s best policy,” Rochefoucauld suggests, “is to assume that none of these maxims is directed at him, and that he is the sole exception. …. After that, I guarantee that he will be the first to subscribe to them.”

2. The 48 Laws of Power, by Robert Greene
I’ve never read this book in a cover-to-cover sense but I’ve read each of the laws. More than that, I’ve broken each of the laws. I’ll give you an example. The first law is “Never outshine the master.” Once I worked directly for a CEO. I worked as hard as I ever have to show off my talents and skills and at every turn it backfired over and over again. The lesson — “make your masters appear more brilliant than they are and you will attain the heights of power.” I wish I read this book earlier in my career, it certainly would have been helpful.

3. Xenophon’s Cyrus the Great: The Arts of Leadership and War by Xenophon
This book sat on my shelf for a year before I picked it up recently. This is the biography of Cyrus the Great, also known as Cyrus the Elder, who made the oldest known declaration of human rights. The book is full of leadership lessons. Here’s an example. “Brevity is the soul of command. Too much talking suggests desperation on the part of the leader. Speak shortly, decisively and to the point–and couch your desires in such natural logic that no one can raise objections. Then move on.”

4. Letters from a Self-Made Merchant to His Son
This no nonsense collection of 20 letters from a self-made man to his son are nothing short of brilliant as far as I’m concerned. This is a great example of timeless wisdom. The broad theme is how to raise your children in a world where they have plenty but the lessons apply to parents and non-parents alike.

5. Models of my Life by Herbert Simon
An autobiography of Nobel laureate Herbert A. Simon, a remarkable polymath who more people should know about. In an age of increasing specializing, he’s a rare generalist — applying what he learned as a scientist to other aspects of his life. Crossing disciplines, he was at the intersection of “information sciences.” He won the Nobel for his theory of “bounded rationality,” and is perhaps best known for his insightful quote “A wealth of information creates a poverty of attention.”

And one more… just for good luck.

6. Meditations by Marcus Aurelius
Ok, this is a bonus pick as I figured a many of you might have read this already. It was, after all, on the 2013 Farnam Street reader’s choice list. If you bought it and haven’t read it, consider this a nudge. The best way to sum up this book is: A simple and powerful guide to life. This book was never intended for publication it was for himself. How many people write a book of epigrams to themselves? Get it. Read it. Live it.

The Great Books

The Great Books_opt

We all want to read more.

If reading older books is exponentially more beneficial for acquiring knowledge than reading newer things, then reading the great books is a good place to start.

These books build the foundation of knowledge.

One of the best places to find a list of the great books is St. John’s College in Annapolis, Maryland.

The interdisciplinary curriculum focuses on the foundational works of philosophy, literature, history, political science, theology, economics, music, mathematics, and the laboratory sciences.

Sounds like the type of education I didn’t get in school and I’m making up for now. At St. John’s, all classes are conducted seminar-style.

By engaging in these small seminar classes, students learn skills of critical analysis and cooperative inquiry. Students also refine their ability to think, write, and speak across all disciplines by writing substantial annual essays and defending them in oral examinations.

Many consider the curriculum an outrage. I wish it were more common.

In the New Yorker, former alum Salvatore Scibona writes, “The college’s curriculum was an outrage. No electives. Not a single book in the seminar list by a living author.” “However,” he continued,

no tests. No grades, unless you asked to see them. No textbooks—I was confused. In place of an astronomy manual, you would read Copernicus. No books about Aristotle, just Aristotle. Like, you would read book-books. The Great Books, so called, though I had never heard of most of them. It was akin to taking holy orders, but the school—St. John’s College—had been secular for three hundred years. In place of praying, you read.

The Great Books

I’m going to post the list in the order students encounter them: freshman, sophomore, junior and senior.

The first year is devoted to Greek authors and their pioneering understanding of the liberal arts; the second year contains books from the Roman, medieval, and Renaissance periods; the third year has books of the 17th and 18th centuries, most of which were written in modern languages; the fourth year brings the reading into the 19th and 20th centuries.

FRESHMAN YEAR

HOMER: Iliad, Odyssey

AESCHYLUS: Agamemnon, Libation Bearers, EumenidesPrometheus Bound

SOPHOCLES: Oedipus Rex, Oedipus at Colonus, Antigone, Philoctetes, Ajax

THUCYDIDES: Peloponnesian War

EURIPIDES: Hippolytus, Bacchae

HERODOTUS: Histories

ARISTOPHANES: Clouds

PLATO: Meno, Gorgias, Republic, Apology, Crito, Phaedo, Symposium, Parmenides, Theaetetus, Sophist, Timaeus, Phaedrus

ARISTOTLE: Physics, Metaphysics, Nicomachean Ethics, Poetics, Politics, On Generation and Corruption, Parts of Animals, Generation of Animals

EUCLID: Elements

LUCRETIUS: On the Nature of Things

PLUTARCH: Lycurgus, Solon

NICOMACHUS: Arithmetic

LAVOISIER: Elements of Chemistry

HARVEY: Motion of the Heart and Blood

SOPHOMORE YEAR

HEBREW BIBLE

THE BIBLE: New Testament

ARISTOTLE: De Anima, On Interpretation, Prior Analytics, Categories

APOLLONIUS: Conics

VIRGIL: Aeneid

PLUTARCH: “Caesar,” “Cato the Younger,” “Antony,” “Brutus

EPICTETUS: Discourses, Manual

TACITUS: Annals

PTOLEMY: Almagest

PLOTINUS: The Enneads

AUGUSTINE: Confessions

MAIMONIDES: Guide for the Perplexed

ST. ANSELM: Proslogium

AQUINAS: Summa Theologica

DANTE: Divine Comedy

CHAUCER: Canterbury Tales

MACHIAVELLI: The Prince, Discourses

KEPLER: Epitome IV

RABELAIS: Gargantua and Pantagruel

PALESTRINA: Missa Papae Marcelli

MONTAIGNE: Essays

VIETE: Introduction to the Analytical Art

BACON: Novum Organum

SHAKESPEARE: Richard II, Henry IV, The Tempest, As You Like It, Hamlet, Othello, Macbeth, King Lear, and Sonnets

DESCARTES: Geometry, Discourse on Method

PASCAL: Generation of Conic Sections

BACH: St. Matthew Passion, Inventions

HAYDN: Quartets

MOZART: Operas

BEETHOVEN: Third Symphony

SCHUBERT: Songs

MONTEVERDI: L’Orfeo

STRAVINSKY: Symphony of Psalms

JUNIOR YEAR

CERVANTES: Don Quixote

GALILEO: Two New Sciences

HOBBES: Leviathan

DESCARTES: Meditations, Rules for the Direction of the Mind

MILTON: Paradise Lost

LA ROCHEFOUCAULD: Maximes

LA FONTAINE: Fables

PASCAL: Pensees

HUYGENS: Treatise on Light, On the Movement of Bodies by Impact

ELIOT: Middlemarch

SPINOZA: Theological-Political Treatise

LOCKE: Second Treatise of Government

RACINE: Phaedre

NEWTON: Principia Mathematica

KEPLER: Epitome IV

LEIBNIZ: Monadology, Discourse on Metaphysics, Essay On Dynamics, Philosophical Essays, Principles of Nature and Grace

SWIFT: Gulliver’s Travels

HUME: Treatise of Human Nature

ROUSSEAU: Social Contract, The Origin of Inequality

MOLIERE: Le Misanthrope

ADAM SMITH: Wealth of Nations

KANT: Critique of Pure Reason, Foundations of the Metaphysics of Morals

MOZART: Don Giovanni

JANE AUSTEN: Pride and Prejudice

DEDEKIND: “Essay on the Theory of Numbers
Articles of Confederation,” “Declaration of Independence,” “Constitution of the United States of America

HAMILTON, JAY AND MADISON: The Federalist

TWAIN: The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn

WORDSWORTH: The Two Part Prelude of 1799

SENIOR YEAR

GOETHE: Faust

DARWIN: Origin of Species

HEGEL: Phenomenology of Mind, “Logic” (from the Encyclopedia)

LOBACHEVSKY: Theory of Parallels

TOCQUEVILLE: Democracy in America

KIERKEGAARD: Philosophical Fragments, Fear and Trembling

WAGNER: Tristan and Isolde

MARX: Capital, Political and Economic Manuscripts of 1844, The German Ideology

DOSTOEVSKI: Brothers Karamazov

TOLSTOY: War and Peace

MELVILLE: Benito Cereno

WILLIAM JAMES; Psychology, Briefer Course

NIETZSCHE: Beyond Good and Evil

FREUD: Introductory Lectures on Psychoanalysis

DUBOIS: The Souls of Black Folk

HUSSERL: Crisis of the European Sciences

HEIDEGGER: Basic Writings

EINSTEIN: Selected papers

CONRAD: Heart of Darkness

FAULKNER: Go Down Moses

FLAUBERT: Un Coeur Simple

WOOLF: Mrs. Dalloway

So here’s the deal. Pick a few books and start pecking away.

Bill Gates — My Top Reads of 2012

I read some amazing books this year. Every one of these books changed my worldview and I highly recommend them if you’re looking for inspiring reading.

—Bill Gates

The Better Angels of Our Nature: Why Violence Has Declined

How would you go about making the world a fundamentally better place? Eliminating violence, particularly violent deaths, would be a great start. Cognitive scientist Steven Pinker shows in his masterful new book just how violence is declining. It is a triumph of a book.

Deng Xiaoping and the Transformation of China

If you’re going to read one book about modern China in the period after Mao, then this is the book you should read. Though the book is framed around the rise of Deng Xiaoping and his reforms that transformed China into an economic powerhouse, Ezra Vogel’s compelling biography examines how China went from being a desperately poor country to certainly one of the two most important countries in the world today.

The Quest: Energy, Security, and the Remaking of the Modern World

Recently I finished reading Daniel Yergin’s new book, The Quest: Energy, Security, and the Remaking of the Modern World. It’s a valuable guide to the complex factors shaping the world’s energy needs, supplies and prices – even if a workout at over 800 pages.

Moonwalking with Einstein

I never thought much about whether I could improve my memory across a wider set of domains, but now I think I could, after reading Moonwalking with Einstein: The Art and Science of Remembering Everything, by a young science writer, Joshua Foer. It’s absolutely phenomenal, one of the most interesting books I’ve read this summer.

Behind the Beautiful Forevers: Life, Death, and Hope in a Mumbai Undercity

I just finished Katherine Boo’s book, Behind the Beautiful Forevers. It reads like a novel by Dickens, but is a real-life depiction of the challenges hundreds of millions of people face every day in urban slums. It’s also a reminder of the humanity that connects us all.

One Billion Hungry: Can we Feed the World?

Conway’s book is well organized, with chapters on hunger, agricultural innovation, and environmental challenges that can easily be read on their own. Feeding our growing world is fundamentally important to all of us, no matter where you live. If there’s one book I’d recommend reading to get the definitive story about the state of agriculture today and what we need to focus on to increase productivity and eliminate hunger, it would be One Billion Hungry.

A World-Class Education

Vivien Stewart in her book, A World Class Education, looks at five countries—Singapore, Canada, Finland, China, and Australia—where students are doing significantly better on global assessments than students in the U.S. Despite differences in the political systems and cultural contexts of these countries, there are some common policies and practices that drive success. Understanding how other countries are succeeding can offer insights that help us do a better job here in the U.S.

Academically Adrift: Limited Learning on College Campuses

Before reading this book, I took it for granted that colleges were doing a very good job. But there is really no measurement or feedback system that tracks results, to help guide students and help institutions improve. Not overall, and not for individual courses of study. What do students in different programs learn, how many graduates get jobs in their field, how much do they earn? The outputs of higher education are a deeply understudied question.

This Time is Different: Eight Centuries of Financial Folly

An important book that will affect policy discussions for a long time to come, This Time Is Different exposes centuries of financial missteps.

The City that Became Safe: New York’s Lessons for Urban Crime and Its Control

New York has shown that crime rates can be greatly reduced without increasing prison populations. New York teaches that targeted harm reduction strategies can drastically cut down on drug related violence even if illegal drug use remains high. And New York has proven that epidemic levels of violent crime are not hard-wired into the populations or cultures of urban America. This careful and penetrating analysis of how the nation’s largest city became safe rewrites the playbook on crime and its control for all big cities.

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Best psychology books of 2012

The best psychology books of 2012 as chosen by the Guardian:

Missing Out: In Praise of the Unlived Life

In this elegant, compassionate, and absorbing book, Phillips draws deeply on his own clinical experience as well as on the works of Shakespeare and Freud, of D. W. Winnicott and William James, to suggest that frustration, not getting it, and and getting away with it are all chapters in our unlived lives—and may be essential to the one fully lived.

The Shrink and the Sage

Philosopher Julian Baggini and his psychotherapist partner Antonia Macaro offer intriguing answers to life’s questions. Can infidelity be good for you? What does it mean to stay true to yourself? Must we fulfil our potential? Self-help with a distinctly cerebral edge.

The Antidote: Happiness for People Who Can’t Stand Positive Thinking

Burkeman’s new book is a witty, fascinating, and counterintuitive read that turns decades of self-help advice on its head and forces us to rethink completely our attitudes toward failure, uncertainty, and death.

Quiet: The Power of Introverts in a World That Can’t Stop Talking

Passionately argued, impressively researched, and filled with indelible stories of real people, Quiet shows how dramatically we undervalue introverts, and how much we lose in doing so.

Together: The Rituals, Pleasures and Politics of Cooperation

Sennett contends that cooperation is a craft, and the foundations for skillful cooperation lie in learning to listen well and discuss rather than debate. In Together he explores how people can cooperate online, on street corners, in schools, at work, and in local politics. He traces the evolution of cooperative rituals from medieval times to today, and in situations as diverse as slave communities, socialist groups in Paris, and workers on Wall Street.

The Better Angels of Our Nature

In his gripping and controversial new work, New York Times bestselling author Steven Pinker shows that despite the ceaseless news about war, crime, and terrorism, violence has actually been in decline over long stretches of history.

The Righteous Mind: Why Good People Are Divided by Politics and Religion

Why can’t our political leaders work together as threats loom and problems mount? Why do people so readily assume the worst about the motives of their fellow citizens? In The Righteous Mind, social psychologist Jonathan Haidt explores the origins of our divisions and points the way forward to mutual understanding.

Beyond Human Nature: How Culture and Experience Shape the Human Mind

In this passionate corrective to the idea that DNA is destiny, Jesse Prinz focuses on the most extraordinary aspect of human nature: that nurture can supplement and supplant nature, allowing our minds to be profoundly influenced by experience and culture.

Science of Love and Betrayal

Basing his arguments on new and experimental scientific research, Robin Dunbar explores the psychology and ethology of romantic love and how our evolutionary programming still affects our behaviour. Fascinating and illuminating, witty and accessible, “The Science of Love and Betrayal” is essential reading for anyone who’s ever wondered why we fall in love and what on earth is going on when we do.

Are You My Mother?: A Comic Drama

If you want the complexities of love in a family story that comes in bold graphic form and contains a host of psy-knowledge and Winnicottian lore, then Alison Bechdel’s comic drama Are You My Mother? is pure bliss.

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